PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

SPRING COURSES

 

Science in the Outdoors

beetle

Next Offered in Spring 2019
This course typically takes place on one Saturday at Woodland Park Zoo (8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m.) and may be taken for Washington state-approved STEM clock hours. Online registration will be available beginning November 1, 2018.

In this Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) focused workshop, participants will explore strategies for engaging students in learning about animals in the outdoors while meeting state learning standards in science. We will practice scientific field methods for observing and identifying animals and learn how to participate in programs to monitor and protect local habitats. Experiences on zoo grounds, discussions and activities will support participants in developing skills for engaging students in STEM practices including engineering design, planning and carrying out investigations and developing and using models. The course focuses on a different animal group and/or ecological concept each spring.

 

 

Global Biomes

Rhino Glenn at Assam Rhino Reserve

Next Offered in Spring 2019
This course typically takes place over two Saturday sessions (8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m.) as well as a Monday evening presentation at Woodland Park Zoo. The course may be taken for graduate credit, Washington state-approved STEM clock hours or audit. Participants taking the course for credit will complete web-based coursework from late January through early May. Online registration will be available beginning November 1, 2018.

A bioclimatic zone, or biome, is a region broadly defined by the relationship of the area's temperature patterns, annual precipitation and living organisms. This course will introduce the biomes of the world through zoo-based explorations of the characteristic vegetation and wildlife of biomes represented at Woodland Park Zoo and current conservation issues relevant to each. This course may include an evening presentation by a National Geographic Live presenter as well as a full day at Woodland Park Zoo that builds on the content of the evening presentation (specific content is determined according to the presenter's area of expertise). Course offerings typically focus on a specific region, such as Biomes of Asia or Biomes of Africa.


 

Perspectives in Environment & Culture

jaguar 

Next Offered in Spring 2020
This course typically takes place over two Saturday sessions (8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m.) and includes a Monday evening presentation at Woodland Park Zoo and other Seattle-area locations. The course may be taken for graduate credit, Washington state-approved STEM hours or audit. Participants taking the course for credit will complete web-based coursework from late January through early May. Online registration will be available beginning November 1, 2019. 

Through the lenses of geography, anthropology and biology, this course explores past, present and future human-environment interactions across the world, particularly those involving wildlife. The course may include an evening presentation by a National Geographic Live presenter as well as a full day at Woodland Park Zoo that builds on the content of the evening presentation (specific content is determined according to the presenter's area of expertise). Using a multi-disciplinary approach, participants will gain a deeper understanding of cultural interactions with the natural environment through experiences on zoo grounds, presentations and activities that can be used to engage students in exploring these issues. 

contact

If you cannot find the answers to your questions or need additional assistance please contact the registration office by phone at 206.548.2424 x4 or by email.