WILDLIFE SURVIVAL PROGRAM

Investing in endangered species before it’s too late.

ABOUT THE PROGRAM

 

Of the 62,000 species of vertebrate animals, scientists estimate that about 20% are at risk of extinction before the end of the century. This loss of species diversity is unprecedented and in almost all cases human caused. But humans can also be part of the solution.

The Wildlife Survival Fund provides grants to field projects and initiatives recommended by Woodland Park Zoo curators and the Association of Zoos & Aquariums Species Survival Programs. Projects awarded through the Wildlife Survival Fund represent animals in the zoo’s collection. 

 

 

PROJECTS IN AFRICA

 



Madagascar Fauna & Flora

Location: Toamasina, Madagascar

Project Since: 2018

Mission:
The Madagascar Fauna and Flora Group protects the rich biodiversity of Eastern Madagascar through conservation, research, education and capacity building.  

Highlights:
The program is beginning to see success in captive breeding for release of the critically endangered Blue-eyed black lemur, and the Greater bamboo lemur.



Colobus Conservation Ltd.

Location: Diani, Kenya

Project Since: 2014

Mission:
To promote, in close cooperation with other organizations and local communities, the conservation, preservation and protection of primates, in particular the Angolan colobus monkey and its associated coastal forest habitat in Kenya.

Highlights:
Colobus Conservation operates a successful 24-hour primate injury response service for all primate species in Diani. In 2018, they responded to 177 welfare call outs.



Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund

Location: Rwanda

Project Since: 2018

Mission:
The Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund operates daily protection for approximately half of Rwanda’s mountain gorillas, as well as daily behavioral data collection, scientific research on gorillas and their conservation, and biodiversity research.

Highlights:
New census results revealed growth of the population from 480 to 604 individuals.

 

PROJECTS IN ASIA

 



Asian Elephant Support

Location: Indonesia & Sumatra     

Project Since: 2014

Mission:
To establish a department for wildlife and conservation medicine at Syiah Kuala University in order to train veterinarians and veterinary students in the skills and services needed for wildlife conservation and welfare in the field.  

Highlights:
Over 220 students have attended classes on elephant, orangutan, sun bear and crocodile medical management and wildlife conservation laws.



Komodo Dragon Survival Program

Location: Indonesia

Project Since: 2018

Mission:
To provide sound information on wildlife biology to help in devising management and conservation plans for the Komodo dragon and its natural habitat.

Highlights:
Komodos on Flores Island have been confirmed as genetically different from the populations on Komodo and Rinca, making them more sensitive to extinction.



MYCAT: Citizen Action for Tigers

Location: West Malaysia

Project Since: 2014

Mission:
To protect and recover the tiger population in and around Taman Negara and to monitor the movement of tigers and other wildlife within the corridor linking the National Parks to the Main Range, which forms the world’s fourth largest tiger landscape.

Highlights:
Since its inception in 2018, 1,813 CAT walkers from 35 countries have patrolled 3,387 km of rainforest and deactivated 166 snares or traps.



Partula Recovery and Reintroduction Project

Location: Society Islands, French Polynesia    

Project Since: 2004

Mission:
To preserve and enhance the survival prospects of all surviving endemic tree snail species of the family Partulidae within their natural range in French Polynesia, and to re-establish the International breeding program’s Extinct in
the Wild Partula species on their natural range islands.

Highlights:
6 species were released in 2018 on Tahiti and Moorea islands, and there is evidence of survival.



Red Panda Network

Location: Nepal

Project Since: 2012

Mission:
Red Panda Network saves wild red panda and preserves the habitat in the temperate mountain forest of Himalaya through adaptive community based research, education, habitat restoration and sustainable livelihoods by involving and empowering local people themselves.

Highlights:
In 2018, six red pandas bound for the pet trade were rescued from smugglers. Thanks to RPN’s field work there has been a 60% decrease in traps and snares in the PIT corridor of Eastern Nepal.



Silent Forest: Asian Songbird Crisis

Location: Bali, Indonesia

Project Since: 2015

Mission:
To improve the situation of Asian songbirds in their natural habitat and to develop an increased knowledge and understanding of the threats to these birds and how zoos can contribute to save them.

Highlights:
The Bali Myna exists now in its native range only as a result of annual supplementations of captive-bred birds in Bali Barat National Park.



Cranes of Asia: Muraviovka Park

Location: Tambovski District of the Amur Region, Russia – on the border of China

Project Since: 1999

Mission:
Muraviovka Park demonstrates wetland and natural resource management that sustains rare wildlife while involving and benefitting local communities. The Park disseminates effective conservation methods through the Amur Region and beyond, linking local, regional, and international communities who share a vision for healthy co-existence of migratory waterbirds and people.

Highlights:
The ban on spring hunting in the entire Amur River Basin, fewer grass fires, and abundant precipitation since late summer 2019 that restored the surface water levels created excellent conditions for water birds going into the year 2020. Due to travel restrictions, we were not able to proceed with the planned surveys of endangered species and other bird studies that were to be conducted by visiting researchers. On May 11, our Bird Keeper Sergei Rozhkov filmed 17 Siberian Cranes flying over the Park Headquarters. This flock made a 3-4-day stopover at the Park prior to continue their migration north.



Turtle Survival Alliance

Location: Cambodia

Project Since: 2005

Mission:
Transforming passion for turtles into conservation action.

Highlights:
Recent increases in the Koh Kong Reptile Conservation Center will allow for additional breeding and rearing of the critically endangered Southern River Terrapin.



Wildlife SOS

Location: Chhattisgarh, India

Project Since: 2015

Mission:
Wildlife SOS aims to protect and preserve India’s wildlife, run rehabilitation and rescue centers for wildlife, conserve habitats, raise awareness, conduct research, study biodiversity and provide sustainable livelihoods for communities otherwise dependent on wildlife to earn a livelihood.

Highlights:
This new project will allow us to learn about the base causes of human-sloth bear conflict, and how to take steps to minimize them.

WORLDWIDE PROJECTS

 



Amphibian Ark

Location: Argentina

Supported Since: 2011

Mission:
To promote the long-term conservation of the El Rincon Stream Frog (Pleurodema somuncurense) and other threatened and endemic species of the Somuncura Plateau in Argentina.

Highlights:
In early November 2020 we received some good news, with the frogs reproducing again in the breeding facilities. Between November and December, seven clutches of eggs were produced within the ex situ facilities. Five of these clutches, came from the original frogs that were collected from the wild (the founder individuals), and then we obtained another two clutches of eggs, from individuals which were born in captivity in 2018. These eggs represent the first, second-generation ex situ reproduction of El Rincon Stream Frogs. Our further observations concluded that these second generations of eggs were viable and resulted in healthy tadpoles.



Northern Jaguar Project

Location: Sonora, Mexico

Supported Since: 2012

Mission:
The mission of the Northern Jaguar Project is to preserve and recover the world’s northernmost population of the jaguar, its unique natural habitats, and native wildlife under its protection as a flagship, keystone and umbrella species.

Highlights:
Over the last year we recorded 12 jaguars in 150 photos on the reserve and Viviendo con Felinos ranches. Most notable, the female jaguar Libelula is now our longest documented jaguar at 8.5 years, the oldest known jaguar in this region. A highlight came when Libelula was photographed together with El Guapo, a male jaguar. The prospect of their offspring reveals how we are heading in the right direction to provide a future for this endangered species. While we waited for a glimpse of their offspring, we had a surprise: Luisa, another female, was seen with a jaguar we believe is her cub, Choki.



Red-breasted Goose International Working Group

AEWA (African-Eurasian Migratory Waterbirds Agreement)

Location: Bulgaria

Supported Since: 2019

Mission:
To improve knowledge of the specific threats, migration ecology, and current distribution of red-breasted geese and contribute to the overall improvement of their population conservation status.

Highlights:
GPS and microwave transmitter data have provided incredible information on red-breasted goose habitat usage, migration paths, and challenges faced along their migration flyway. Patrols in Bulgaria, Russia, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, and Romania work together to prevent poaching of red-breasted geese as well as other types of illegal killing.

Information from birds tagged in February 2020 has been used to identify key stopover sites used during migration. Several of these areas have received seasonal protected status because of this work.

 

PROJECTS IN SOUTH AMERICA

 



Chacoan Peccary Project

Location: Paraguay

Project Since: 2018

Mission:
Conservation management of the endangered endemic species as well as protection for Chacoan biodiversity.

Highlights:
Work in the project is now expanding beyond peccaries to include lowland tapirs and amphibians.

Our Mission

Woodland Park Zoo saves wildlife and inspires everyone to make conservation a priority in their lives.

Land Acknowledgment

Woodland Park Zoo recognizes that these are the lands of the Tribal signatories of the Treaty of Point Elliott. We acknowledge their stewardship of this place continues to this day and that it is our responsibility to join them to restore the relationship with the living world around us.

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