Planting a pollinator garden is a great way to support local pollinating animals and your community.

Pollinator Badge

 

Capitol Campus Pollinator Garden

Butterflies, bees, hummingbirds, moths and other pollinators visit flowers for food in the form of energy-rich nectar and protein-rich pollen. When they do, they transfer pollen between flowers of the same species. These pollinated flowers then produce fertile seeds.

Many of these seeds provide food for people and for wildlife, but they also color our landscapes with beautiful wildflowers and some of our favorite garden stunners!

 

Directions to the pollinator garden

 

Planting for Pollinators

Insect pollinators visit flowers to eat nectar and pollen, but they need more than just flowers to survive and reproduce. Young insects, like caterpillars, need leaves and other fresh foliage. Some solitary bees create nests in cavities like hollowed plant stems, abandoned beetle burrows, or other dry, sheltered spaces.

The more you diversify your plants, the more pollinators you’ll have around to enjoy all year!

 

Be a Bug Hero

Join us to help pollinators in Washington state!

Insects need advocates who are willing to make changes in their own landscapes, teach others to care for them and spread the word to encourage pollinator- friendly practices across the state. The future is bright for pollinators when we work together.

 

Additional Resources

 

This interpretive garden is designed by Woodland Park Zoo in partnership with:

Our Mission

Woodland Park Zoo saves wildlife and inspires everyone to make conservation a priority in their lives.

Land Acknowledgment

Woodland Park Zoo recognizes that these are the lands of the Tribal signatories of the Treaty of Point Elliott. We acknowledge their stewardship of this place continues to this day and that it is our responsibility to join them to restore the relationship with the living world around us.

Humane Certification
Seattle Parks & Recreation
Association of Zoos & Aquariums

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5500 Phinney Ave. N., Seattle, WA 98103   |  206.548.2500  |   zooinfo@zoo.org

SPECIAL UPDATE
To protect animals most at risk from exposure to avian influenza, some exhibits are temporarily closed or empty, and programming may be altered.
The Humboldt penguin exhibit is now temporarily open to the public.